EAMS 2021 Conference Registration/Abstract Submission now open!

Last year, some members of the WeBWorK community presented/attended the EAMS conference and it was a great experience! We encourage you to propose a talk and/or attend this year. Below is the information:

The fourth international conference on E-Assessment in Mathematical Sciences (EAMS) takes place between 21st June and 2nd July 2021. The conference brings together researchers and practitioners with an interest in e-assessment for mathematics and science. 

EAMS 2021 will again be an entirely online conference, following last year’s successful move to a fully virtual format. The conference will feature a mix of live sessions and web-based activities, with plenty of opportunity for discussion and collaboration. 

As many of us have spent much of the last year delivering teaching and assessment online, EAMS 2021 presents an opportunity to share best practice, for experts in the field to present the latest developments, and for those new to e-assessment to get hands-on with software. 

Live talks will take place over Zoom at 9am or 4pm BST (UTC +1) each day, with recordings available later. We hope that the online format and longer timescale will allow participants to engage more deeply with the material presented. 

The call for talk and workshop proposals is currently open. If you have some research or an innovative technique related to mathematical e-assessment that you would like to present, then please submit an abstract at eams.ncl.ac.uk/call-for-speakers.  

To attend the conference, please register for free at eams.ncl.ac.uk/register

Published by The WeBWorK Project

WeBWorK is an open-source online homework system for math and sciences courses. WeBWorK is supported by the MAA and the NSF and comes with an Open Problem Library (OPL) of over 35,000 homework problems. Problems in the OPL target most lower division undergraduate math courses and some advanced courses. Supported courses include college algebra, discrete mathematics, probability and statistics, single and multivariable calculus, differential equations, linear algebra and complex analysis.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: